Understanding the various Orthodontics options

There are a lot of treatment options these days, from retainers to clear aligners to invisible, metal, ceramic and micro braces. They each have their uses. Orthodontists have the specialized knowledge to consider all possibilities, based on variables like your age, possible jaw imbalances, differences in the size of your teeth, and more. They know what to use and when to use it, and will work with you to make the best decision - for your best smile.

 

Traditional Braces

Traditional braces are comprised of brackets that are affixed to teeth and wires that are threaded through slots in the brackets.  Some patients may also have metal bands encircling back teeth.  Wires are held to brackets by tiny rubber bands called “ligatures” or “o-rings.”  Brackets are generally made of stainless steel.  Wires are made of metal alloys and deliver a constant, gentle force to move teeth.

 

See your orthodontic specialist for the treatment option that is best for your individual needs.

 

Lingual Braces

Lingual braces are an alternative to traditional braces in which custom made braces are bonded to the back of the teeth making them non-visible externally.

 

See your orthodontic specialist for the treatment option that is best for your individual needs.

 

Invisalign ® Clear Aligners

Aligners are clear, thin, plastic-like trays that are formed to fit an individual’s teeth. Patients are responsible for putting in and removing their aligners. A series of aligners is created to move teeth. Each aligner is worn for 2 weeks, and moves teeth a fraction of a millimeter at a time. Patients must remove aligners for meals and when brushing/flossing. The number of aligners needed to correct misaligned teeth varies based on the individual’s orthodontic problem and its correction.

 

Find out more about Invisalign invisible braces. See your orthodontic specialist and clinic for the treatment option that is best for your individual needs.

 

Retainers

Removable retainers are clear, thin, slightly flexible, and made of a plastic-like material. They fit the exact shape and placement of the teeth.

 

Not only are there removable retainers, but there are also fixed retainers. Both types of retainers hold teeth in their new positions after “active” orthodontic treatment is completed. This allows newly formed bone to harden around the teeth. Wearing retainers as instructed is the key to maintaining the success of orthodontic treatment. Patients may be advised to wear retainers full-time for the first six to twelve months after “active” treatment ends, with subsequent wear time reduced to night-time only. When not in the mouth, removable retainers should be kept in the case provided by the orthodontist.

 

See your orthodontic specialist for the treatment option that is best for your individual needs.

 

Mouthguard

A mouthguard is used by atheletes of all ages to protect teeth from trauma during competitive and individual sporting activities.  They are made of a variety of materials, some relatively flexible and others relatively rigid.  Custom-made mouthguards deliver the greatest protection.  Over-the-counter mouthguards are available in "boil and bite" versions, which are formed to the individual's mouth, and "ready to wear" versions, which cannot be customized and offer the least protection.  The American Association of Orthodontists advocates the use of mouth guards by children and adults during organized and recreational sporting activities.

 

See your orthodontic specialist for the treatment option that is best for your individual needs.

 

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